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“Sis and Jock’s Hot as Hell West Texas Tour!”: Docent takes a 1,318 mile road trip in Frank Reaugh’s footsteps

By Isabel Dunn

Harry Ransom Center docents are volunteer guides that lead free daily tours of the Center’s exhibitions. In the months leading up to exhibition openings, docents work closely with curators to gain a more complete understanding of exhibition items and content. The docent training process involves readings, discussion, and intense familiarization with the exhibition.  Read more

Listen: Join Frank Reaugh’s cowboys in O Roundup

By Kathleen Telling

One of our patrons’ favorite features about our current exhibition Frank Reaugh: Landscapes of Texas and the American West, is the “guide by cell” audio tour for visitors. This audio tour lets visitors call in and hear informational snippets about the paintings on display. Ransom Center Curator of Art Peter Mears discusses highlights from the exhibition, and Project Specialist Greg Curtis speaks as the voice of Frank Reaugh to narrate the artist’s own comments.

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Listen: Driving the Herd

By Isabel Dunn

One of visitors’ favorite features about our current exhibition Frank Reaugh: Landscapes of Texas and the American West, is the “guide by cell” audio tour. This audio tour lets visitors call in and hear informational snippets about the paintings. For the exhibition, Ransom Center Curator of Art Peter Mears discusses highlights from the exhibition, and Project Specialist Greg Curtis spoke as the voice of Frank Reaugh to narrate the artist’s own comments. Read more

Labor Day weekend hours

By Jennifer Tisdale

The Ransom Center Galleries will be open during Labor Day weekend, including on Monday, September 7.

 

The galleries will be open from noon to 5 p.m. this Saturday and Sunday, with free docent-led exhibition tours at noon and 2 p.m. On Labor Day, the galleries are open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with a tour at noon. Tours meet in the lobby, and no reservations are required. Read more

Thoroughly Modern Alice: Incarnations of Lewis Carroll’s heroine through the years

By Alexandra Bass

The titular heroine of Lewis Carroll’s whimsical classic Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass has changed to reflect the aesthetics of the times outside her fictional word. The fantastical nature of the story allows a certain freedom of temporality: although the narrative was written to occur in Victorian Britain, there are no specific indicators of the year, and the story could just as easily have been set in the twenty-first century. The changing visual depictions of Alice reflect this sense of timelessness. Having a contemporary-looking Alice makes it easy for younger audiences to relate to her and helps to explain Wonderland’s enduring popularity.

 

First published in 1865, Sir John Tenniel’s iconic illustrations imagine Alice in a contemporary mid-Victorian pinafore, apron, and stockings. Tenniel’s depiction of Alice was the standard for the rest of the 1800s, but by the turn of the century, when the book went out of copyright, other illustrators reimagined the tale. Bessie Gutmann created Nouveau Alice in 1907, who wears a white, high-necked dress with full, long sleeves; her hair is long, swept up, and adorned with a flower.

 

In the 1920s Alice became a sporty flapper. Willy Pogany’s 1929 illustrations depict a lanky Alice, somewhat older than previous representations, wearing a short, plaid skirt, short sleeve top with a tie at the neck, and knee socks. Her hair is bobbed and boyish, as per the androgynous Jazz Age fashion.

 

Mid-century Alice reverts to the traditional, much like popular culture at the time. Disney released the animated Alice in Wonderland film in 1951, in which Alice dons a blue dress, white apron, and a black ribbon in her hair, very similar to Tenniel’s depiction. Subsequent illustration from the period shows Disney’s influence.

 

During the 1960s and ’70s, Alice adapts to the fashion of the period. One 1970 edition puts an older-looking Alice in a hot pink minidress with a Brigitte Bardot-esque bouffant; another illustration from the same year makes Alice look like she walked off of the set of The Brady Bunch, in a floral-accented minidress, knee socks, and long, straight hair.

 

The continued success of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is related to its ability to stay relevant and fresh to generations of readers. The story itself is not rooted in any particular temporal setting, and thus Alice has the ability to change her style to look like her readers. Although Alice was created in the Victorian era, she is anything but drab and prim: she is, more than many other literary heroines, thoroughly modern.

 

See examples of some of these book covers in the Ransom Center’s current exhibition Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, on view through July 6. Share “Thoroughly Modern Alice” with #aliceinaustin.

 

Related content:

From the Outside In: Illustration from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, John Tenniel, 1865

 

Read other content related to the exhibition Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

 

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