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Austin Critics' Table Awards recognize two exhibitions

By Jennifer Tisdale

The exhibition "I Have the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America." Photo by Pete Smith.
The exhibition "I Have the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America." Photo by Pete Smith.

The Harry Ransom Center was honored this week by the Austin Critics’ Table Awards in the categories “Museum Exhibition” for I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America and “Touring Show, Art” for Arnold Newman:Masterclass. For more than 20 years, the Austin Critics’ Table Awards have celebrated achievement in the arts disciplines. An informal group of critics annually recognize Austin’s art successes, ranging from visual art to theater.

View a list of the diverse recipients.

“Arnold Newman: At Work” explores photographer through his archive

By Ady Wetegrove

Cover of "Arnold Newman: At Work" by Roy Flukinger.
Cover of "Arnold Newman: At Work" by Roy Flukinger.

In conjunction with the exhibition Arnold Newman: Masterclass, University of Texas Press and the Ransom Center have published Arnold Newman: At Work by Ransom Center Senior Research Curator of Photography Roy Flukinger. Featuring an introductory essay by photo historian Marianne Fulton, the illustrated volume includes Newman’s iconic images alongside his contact sheets, Polaroids, and work prints complete with handwritten notes and marginalia. Providing a contextual overview of the Ransom Center’s Newman archive, the book reveals insights into Newman’s process. The book also includes Newman’s lesser known collages, commercial work, and cityscapes.

Drawing extensively from the Ransom Center’s Newman archive, the book is a rich collection of materials ranging from personal documents—such as Augusta and Arnold Newman’s holiday cards, travel ledgers, and copies of passports and pocketbooks—to some of Newman’s most iconic images. Readers can track the creative process from contact sheets with the photographer’s notes and cropping instructions to the eventual final selection and enlargement.

For Newman, a single session with the sitter was only the beginning of the creative process. Newman’s attentive markups and anecdotes litter the edges of countless contact sheets, and work prints from a portrait sitting allow readers to see how Newman approached his subject and found ways to reveal his or her character. Newman would take 10, 20, 30 and in some cases more than 50 individual photographs of a sitter, making minor adjustments each time. Though highly significant, the differences between the frames are often miniscule, but the variation in their impact can be dramatic.

The Center’s Newman archive contains all of Newman’s negatives, slides and color transparencies, all of his original contact sheets, and more than two thousand prints, including examples of color and collage work. The collection also includes Newman’s original sittings books, correspondence and business files, early sketchbooks and photographic albums.

Read an excerpt from Marianne Fulton’s introduction to the book, which is available for purchase in the Ransom Center’s online store or at the visitors desk during gallery hours. Arnold Newman: Masterclass runs through May 12.

Photo Friday

By Edgar Walters

Each Friday, the Ransom Center shares photos from throughout the week that highlight a range of activities and collection holdings. We hope you enjoy these photos that reveal some of the everyday happenings at the Center.

Senior Research Curator of Photography Roy Flukinger gives Ransom Center staff members a tour of the exhibition “Arnold Newman: Masterclass.” Photo by Alicia Dietrich.
Senior Research Curator of Photography Roy Flukinger gives Ransom Center staff members a tour of the exhibition “Arnold Newman: Masterclass.” Photo by Alicia Dietrich.
Project Archivist Daniela Lozano sleeves contact sheets from the Peter Buckley photography papers and photography collection. The collection is currently being processed and will open to the public in January 2014. Photo by Edgar Walters.
Project Archivist Daniela Lozano sleeves contact sheets from the Peter Buckley photography papers and photography collection. The collection is currently being processed and will open to the public in January 2014. Photo by Edgar Walters.
Volunteer James McBride catalogs 500-year-old Aldine Press books from the Uzielli collection. Photo by Edgar Walters.
Volunteer James McBride catalogs 500-year-old Aldine Press books from the Uzielli collection. Photo by Edgar Walters.

Photo Friday

By Edgar Walters

Each Friday, the Ransom Center shares photos from throughout the week that highlight a range of activities and collection holdings. We hope you enjoy these photos that reveal some of the everyday happenings at the Center.

Guests gather in the south atrium during the “Face  To Face” opening event for “Arnold Newman: Masterclass.” Photo by Kelsey  Robinson.
Guests gather in the south atrium during the “Face To Face” opening event for “Arnold Newman: Masterclass.” Photo by Kelsey Robinson.
“Face To Face” guests visit the cupcake station during the event. Photo by Pete Smith.
“Face To Face” guests visit the cupcake station during the event. Photo by Pete Smith.
The photobooth at the “Face To Face” event recreated an Arnold Newman  photograph of Carl Sandburg and Marilyn Monroe. The Lomography Gallery Store  Austin shot the images on film. Photo by Lindsay  Hutchens.
The photobooth at the “Face To Face” event recreated an Arnold Newman photograph of Carl Sandburg and Marilyn Monroe. The Lomography Gallery Store Austin shot the images on film. Photo by Lindsay Hutchens.
Guests explore the exhibition “Arnold Newman: Masterclass” during the “Face To Face” opening event. Photo by Pete Smith.
Guests explore the exhibition “Arnold Newman: Masterclass” during the “Face To Face” opening event. Photo by Pete Smith.
"The Intertextual Sherlock Holmes," curated by graduate intern Arcadia  Falcone (shown here), is now on view outside the Reading  Room.  This display of rare books and periodicals features Sherlock  Holmes pastiches, parodies, and fanfictions from 1895 to 1975, including  works by Mark Twain, O. Henry, and John Lennon. Photo by Pete Smith.
"The Intertextual Sherlock Holmes," curated by graduate intern Arcadia Falcone (shown here), is now on view outside the Reading Room. This display of rare books and periodicals features Sherlock Holmes pastiches, parodies, and fanfictions from 1895 to 1975, including works by Mark Twain, O. Henry, and John Lennon. Photo by Pete Smith.