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Recent publications

By Harry Ransom Center

Alison K. Frazier, Editor
The Saint between Manuscript and Print in Italy, 1400–1600
University of Toronto Centre for Renaissance and Reformation Studies, July 2015

The 12 essays in this volume identify mutually interactive developments in media and saints’ cults at a time and in a place when both underwent profound change. Focusing on the Italian peninsula between 1400 and 1600, authors analyze specific sites of intense cultural production and innovation. The volume invites further study of saints of all sorts—canonized, popularly recognized, or self-proclaimed—in the fluid media environment of early modernity. Read more

Fellow finds a kindred spirit in Shakespearean actor-manager Donald Wolfit

By Kathleen Telling

Laurence Raw obtained a Fleur Cowles Fellowship to study at the Ransom Center in Spring 2011. He consulted the papers of British actor Donald Wolfit, which the Center acquired in the early 1990s. Comprising prompt books, stage plots, photographs, letters, diaries, and other ephemera, the Wolfit archive is the largest resource devoted to the actor anywhere. Raw is a professor of English at Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey. Read more

New collections of Bernard Malamud’s work released

By Jane Robbins Mize

Novelist Bernard Malamud was one of the most significant Jewish American writers of the twentieth century, and this year, to honor and celebrate his life and work, The Library of America has released two collections of Malamud’s fiction: Novels and Stories of the 1940s & 50s and Novels and Stories of the 1960s. A third collection is forthcoming.

 

The Ransom Center is home to an important archive of Malamud’s work

 

Born in Brooklyn on April 26, 1914, to Russian Jewish immigrants, Malamud earned his Master’s degree from Columbia University and taught writing at Oregon State University and Bennington College. His first novel, The Natural (1952), was adapted into a film starring Robert Redford in 1984. His fourth novel, The Fixer, won both the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize in 1966. Malamud also published a total of six other novels and 65 short stories throughout his career.

 

Malamud’s archive includes correspondence, articles, essays, notebooks, manuscripts, interviews, and more.

 

Related content:

Additional Bernard Malamud letters, typescripts acquired by Ransom Center