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Jim Crace shortlisted for Booker Prize

By Alicia Dietrich

Cover of Jim Crace's novel "Harvest."
Cover of Jim Crace's novel "Harvest."

Author Jim Crace, whose archive resides at the Ransom Center, has been shortlisted for the 2013 Man Booker Prize for Fiction for his novel Harvest (Nan A. Talese/Picador).

Crace was previously shortlisted for the Booker Prize for his 1997 novel Quarantine. The winner of the Booker will be announced at a ceremony in London on Ocober 15.

To celebrate this news, Cultural Compass will be giving away a signed copy of Crace’s novel The Pesthouse. To be eligible to win, tweet a link to this blog post and mention @ransomcenter. If you’re not on Twitter, send an email to hrcgiveaway@gmail.com with “Booker Prize” in the subject line. All tweets and emails must be sent by midnight CST tonight, and winners will be drawn and notified tomorrow, September 12. [Update: The giveaway is now closed. A winner has been selected and notified.]

Related content:

Writer Jim Crace gives writing advice and discusses why T. H. White’s archive at the Ransom Center brought tears to his eyes

Writer Jim Crace discusses his creative process in two videos

Driftwood in an archive

View Recommended Reading from Jim Crace

Opening today: "Radical Transformation: Magnum Photos into the Digital Age"

By Alicia Dietrich

"Russia. Altai Territory. Villagers collecting scrap from a crashed spacecraft, surrounded by thousands of white butterflies. Environmentalists fear for the region's future due to the toxic rocket fuel." 2000. © Jonas Bendiksen/Magnum Photos.
"Russia. Altai Territory. Villagers collecting scrap from a crashed spacecraft, surrounded by thousands of white butterflies. Environmentalists fear for the region's future due to the toxic rocket fuel." 2000. © Jonas Bendiksen/Magnum Photos.

The exhibition Radical Transformation: Magnum Photos into the Digital Age opens today and will be on view through January 5.

Magnum Photos photographers have produced some of the most memorable images of the last century, shaping history and revolutionizing photography’s influence on modern culture. Founded in 1947, it was the first cooperative agency to be established and operated by photographers, thus ensuring unprecedented creative, editorial, and economic independence.

Its founders, including renowned photographers Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, David “Chim” Seymour, and George Rodger, united in their pursuit of creative freedom and their commitment to sharing their images with the world. Membership in this collective empowered photographers to document conflict and liberation, revolution and reform, while preserving their own powerfully distinct points of view.

Established during the post-war golden age of the picture magazine, Magnum has flourished despite the impact of radical technological, economic, and cultural transformations on publishing and media. When television began to take over as the dominant form of mass communication in the 1950s, Magnum photographers explored motion picture and book formats. As the editorial market continued to shrink, photographers found new audiences in museums and galleries. Over the last decade, new technologies have dramatically changed the way photographic imagery is captured, distributed, and consumed. In this new environment, Magnum photographers have kept pace, experimenting with a variety of multimedia platforms to publish their work.

Organized by Jessica S. McDonald and Roy L. Flukinger, this exhibition of approximately 300 works investigates the evolution of Magnum Photos from print photojournalism to the digital age, revealing a global cooperative in continual flux, persistently exploring new relationships between photographers, their subjects, and their viewers.

Coinciding with the exhibition is the publication of Reading Magnum: A Visual Archive of the Modern World (UT Press), edited by Steven Hoelscher, Academic Curator of Photography at the Ransom Center.

The Magnum Photos Collection resides at the Harry Ransom Center courtesy of MSD Capital, Michael and Susan Dell, Glenn and Amanda Fuhrman, and John and Amy Phelan.

Beginning September 17, free docent tours will be offered Tuesdays at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

For groups larger than 10 people, please contact the Ransom Center to make arrangements for a private group tour.

The fall calendar includes many Magnum Photos-related programs, including “Boundless,” the opening celebration for the exhibition on Friday, September 20.

The Ransom Center presents the symposium “Magnum Photos into the Digital Age” on October 25–27. This symposium brings together photographers, curators, and historians to discuss the ways in which Magnum Photos has continually reinvented itself from the moment of its founding. Twelve Magnum photographers, as well as Magnum CEO Giorgio Psacharopulo, are scheduled to appear on panels with a focus on the cooperative’s evolution and future.

University of Texas at Austin partners with online learning initiative

By Abigail Cain

Ransom Center Senior Research Curator of Photography Roy Flukinger and University of Texas at Austin Professor of Philosophy Daniel Bonevac will be teaching an online course this fall on “Ideas of the Twentieth Century.”
Ransom Center Senior Research Curator of Photography Roy Flukinger and University of Texas at Austin Professor of Philosophy Daniel Bonevac will be teaching an online course this fall on “Ideas of the Twentieth Century.”

When University of Texas at Austin Professor of Philosophy Daniel Bonevac and Ransom Center Senior Research Curator of Photography Roy Flukinger taught the course “Ideas of the Twentieth Century” last fall, they had 100 students.

This fall, they will teach over 20,000.

“Ideas of the Twentieth Century” is one of the courses offered by The University of Texas at Austin as part of the UT System’s partnership with edX, a nonprofit online learning initiative. Launched by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2012, edX collaborates with universities across the country to offer massive open online courses (MOOCs).  MOOCs boast unlimited enrollment and are free for all participants.

Of the classes submitted by The University of Texas at Austin for the upcoming school year, four are currently open for registration and will begin September 15. Besides “Ideas of the Twentieth Century,” those interested can also take “Energy 101,” “Age of Globalization,” and “Take Your Medicine: The Impact of Drug Development.”

Bonevac and Flukinger’s course explores the changing mindsets and morals of the past century through the lenses of philosophy, literature, art, and history. Although they have taught this course five times before as one of the University’s Signature Courses for incoming freshmen, the class had to be adapted for an online audience.

“Our time is much more limited in teaching the online course, so each session had to be reduced down to the more basic concepts, trends, and ideas,” Flukinger said. “And, obviously, the other fact that you miss immediately is the interchange of ideas and discussion with your students. The production studio tends to be a much more detached environment than the customary give-and-take of the classroom. But such are always the tradeoffs with any mass media. And, at the same time, I do find it very invigorating to attempt to expand our teaching to a much larger and more diverse global community.”

Application process open for Ransom Center’s fellowships

By Jennifer Tisdale

Cover of Eric Gill's
Cover of Eric Gill's

The Harry Ransom Center invites applications for its 2014–2015 research fellowships in the humanities.

Information about the fellowships and the application process is available online. The deadline for applications, which must be submitted through the Ransom Center’s website, is January 31, 2014, at 5 p.m. CST.

More than 50 fellowships are awarded annually by the Ransom Center to support projects that require substantial on-site use of its collections. The fellowships support research in all areas of the humanities, including literature, photography, film, art, the performing arts, music, and cultural history.

All applicants, with the exception of those applying for dissertation fellowships, must have a Ph.D. or be independent scholars with a substantial record of achievement.

The fellowships range from one to three months, with stipends of $3,000 per month. Also available are $1,200 or $1,700 travel stipends and dissertation fellowships with a $1,500 stipend.

Information about the Ransom Center collections can be found online and in the Guide to the Collections.

The stipends are funded by Ransom Center endowments and annual sponsors , including the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Research Fellowship Endowment, the Dorot Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellowships in Jewish Studies, the Robert De Niro Endowed Fund, the Carl H. Pforzheimer Endowment, the Woodward and Bernstein Endowment, the Frederic D. Weinstein Memorial Fellowship in Twentieth-Century American Literature, the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, the South Central Modern Language Association, the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies at The University of Texas at Austin, and The University of Texas at Austin Office of Graduate Studies.

Applicants will be notified of decisions on April 1, 2014.

The 2014–2015 academic cycle will mark the 25th anniversary of the Ransom Center’s fellowship program. Since the program’s inauguration in 1990, the Center has supported the research of more than 800 scholars through fellowships.