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Harry Ransom Center Awards 70 Fellowships

By Jennifer Tisdale

 

The Harry Ransom Center has awarded 70 research fellowships for 2015–2016.

 

The fellowships support research projects in the humanities that require substantial on-site use of the Ransom Center’s collections of manuscripts, rare books, film, photography, art and performing arts materials.

 

The fellowship recipients, more than half of whom will be coming from abroad, will use Ransom Center materials to support such projects as “Global Hollywood and the New Iranian Cinema,” “Photography and the Nineteenth-Century Illustrated Book,” “Spanish Comedias Sueltas of Agustín Moreto,” “The Bird’s-Eye View and the Viewer, 1400–1700” and “Fashioning the French Camus.”

 

The fellowships range from one to three months in duration and provide $3,000 of support per month. Travel stipends and dissertation fellowships are also awarded. The stipends are funded by individual donors and organizations including the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Creekmore and Adele Fath Charitable Foundation, the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and The University of Texas at Austin’s Office of Graduate Studies, Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies and program in British Studies.

 

The Ransom Center will host six additional scholars in collaboration with the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) International Placement Scheme. This program, funded and administered by the U.K.-based AHRC, offers early-career researchers and AHRC-funded doctoral students from U.K. universities the opportunity to enhance their research with a fellowship at one of its seven participating host institutions.

 


Related content:

Learn about research of past fellows.

 

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Image credit:
Attributed to Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, [Geisha having her photograph taken], not dated, color woodblock; Alfred Junge, scene conception for The Barretts of Wimpole Street, 1956; Fred Fehl, still featuring Sara Yarborough from a production of Cry, 1974; Clement Smith & Co., Hercat’s New and Startling Illusion, 1888; Julia Margaret Cameron, [May Prinsep], 1870, albumen print.].

 

Gabriel García Márquez symposium marks opening of author’s archive

By Jennifer Tisdale

Gabriel García Márquez’s notes for “The General in His Labyrinth.”/Apuntes de Gabriel García Márquez para “El general en su laberinto”.
Gabriel García Márquez’s notes for “The General in His Labyrinth.”/Apuntes de Gabriel García Márquez para “El general en su laberinto”.

The University of Texas at Austin’s LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections and Ransom Center will host the symposium “Gabriel García Márquez: His Life and Legacy” on October 28–30 in Austin. In advance of the symposium, the García Márquez archive will open for research in the Ransom Center’s Reading and Viewing Room on October 21.

 

This news is available in Spanish.

 

The symposium will explore the life and legacy of the beloved author and public intellectual. International scholars, journalists, filmmakers, and former colleagues of García Márquez’s will speak about his global influence in the fields of journalism, filmmaking, and literature. Panel topics include “Gabo: The Storyteller,” “Global Gabo,” “Gabo the Journalist,” and “Gabriel García Márquez: Cinematic Scribe and Muse.” Panelists hail from Colombia, Mexico, and the United States.

 

Author Salman Rushdie will deliver the opening keynote address. Journalist and author Elena Poniatowska will provide the closing keynote.

 

To register for the symposium and view additional information, visit hrc.utexas.edu/GGM or hrc.utexas.edu/GGM_espanol. Registration closes September 30 or when full. The symposium panels will be webcast live.

 

“Gabriel García Márquez: His Life and Legacy” will be the 12th Flair Symposium, a Ransom Center biennial event that honors the ideals set forth by Fleur Cowles and her landmark Flair magazine.

 

The week prior to the symposium, the Ransom Center will open García Márquez’s archive for research. At that time, an online finding aid will provide an inventory and description of the collection. Patrons will be able to access the collection in the Center’s Reading and Viewing Room.

 

Information about using the collections, including establishing a research account, can be found online.

 

The García Márquez archive is currently being processed and cataloged.

 

Annual report helps serve as a blueprint for future growth

By Jennifer Tisdale

The Ransom Center is pleased to share its annual report covering the 2013­­­­­­­­­­­­­–2014 academic year. Ransom Center Director Steve Enniss notes that “the annual report, coupled with the Ransom Center’s recently completed strategic plan, provides a blueprint for how we hope to grow.” The data and information included in the report not only document how the Center serves students, scholars, and the public, but also provide measurable benchmarks to track future progress.

 

A few key metrics from the report are noted below. Beyond these numbers, the annual report describes the Ransom Center’s responsibility to engage the public, support and enhance the collections, and foster research and learning. Financial information related to the Ransom Center’s operating budget and expenditures, endowments, and donations are included. Data reveals which collections are most often circulated and viewed online and the diligent efforts of cataloging, research services, and conservation staff.

 

At a glance:

69,825 total visitors

20,370 online digital collection items

4,438 program attendance

3,045 collection items conserved

1,151,974 unique website visitors

1,119 members

67 research fellowships awarded

6,010 students attending classes

$2,248,751 funds raised

4,834 research visits

139,979 social media followers

The annual report can be read online.

 

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Eric Colleary named as Cline Curator of Theater and Performing Arts

By Christine Lee

The Harry Ransom Center announces the appointment of Eric Colleary as Cline Curator of Theater and Performing Arts. In this position, Colleary will oversee research, access, and interpretation of the Ransom Center’s theater and performing arts materials.

“This appointment signals the Ransom Center’s continued commitment to its already deep theater and performing arts collections, and we can look forward to the many ways Eric will engage students and scholars in the thoughtful exploration of these holdings,” said Ransom Center Director Steve Enniss.

Colleary is currently a visiting professor of performance studies and history in the Department of Theatre and Dance at Macalester College in Saint Paul, MN. He holds a doctorate in Theater Historiography from the University of Minnesota. Previously, Colleary was an archivist and volunteer with the Tretter Collection of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Studies at the University of Minnesota Libraries since 2009, where he organized the exhibition “Stonewall at 40: The Gay and Lesbian Rights Movement in America.” He currently serves on committees for the Theatre Library Association and the American Theatre Archives Project.

“The theater and performing arts collections at the Ransom Center are among the very best in the world,” said Colleary. “I am honored to be joining such a talented team, and I look forward to continuing to develop these collections and engaging with new audiences.”

The Ransom Center has extensive holdings of major American and British dramatists including David Hare, Lillian Hellman, David Mamet, Arthur Miller, George Bernard Shaw, Tom Stoppard, and Tennessee Williams, among others. Within these archives are manuscripts, correspondence, notes, photographs, and performance programs and ephemera.

The performing arts collections contain materials documenting a wide variety of performance genres in the United Kingdom and America. The collections feature holdings in theater, dance, costume and scenic design, opera, and popular entertainments, such as the circus, vaudeville, minstrel shows, puppetry, and magic. The creative process, from concept and staging to publication and revival, constitutes the primary focus of these collections.

Colleary begins his position on July 1.

National Endowment for the Humanities awards grant to preserve and enhance access to sound recordings

By Jennifer Tisdale

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has awarded the Ransom Center a $18,900 grant to preserve and enhance access to the Ransom Center’s non-commercial sound recordings. The grant allows the Ransom Center to complete a preservation survey of more than 13,000 archival sound recordings to establish and document preservation digitization priorities, processes, and standards to enhance access to these research materials.

 

“To make the most prudent and productive use of resources available, the Ransom Center must understand the condition of its sound recordings, as well as their intellectual and research value, in order to make preservation decisions based on clear principles that will expand current and inform future reformatting, stabilizing, and cataloging efforts,” said Ransom Center Director Steve Enniss. “This support from the NEH is powerful validation of the Center’s efforts.”

 

A majority of the recordings are unique and were made for private, non-commercial use. The content varies widely but includes literary spoken word, conference proceedings, dictated notes and letters, field recordings, structured interviews, lectures and readings, musical performances, radio broadcasts, rehearsals, telephone conversations, dictated drafts of writings, and even therapy sessions and psychic readings.

 

Recordings in the collection belong to some of the twentieth- and twenty-first-century’s most notable writers, artists, and performers including Stella Adler, Neal Cassady, Andre Dubus, David Douglas Duncan, Norman Bel Geddes, Spalding Gray, Denis Johnson, Ernest Lehman, Norman Mailer, Bernard Malamud, Gerard Malanga, David Mamet, Nicholas Ray, Ross Russell, David and Jeffrey Selznick, Anne Sexton, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Warren Skaaren, Ted Spagna, Gloria Swanson, and Leon Uris.

 

Of the more than 13,000 audio recordings cataloged in the Ransom Center’s Sound Recordings Collection database, 2,700 have been digitized and are available for streaming onsite in the Center’s Reading and Viewing Room.

 

A long-term goal is to place the Sound Recordings Collection database on the Ransom Center’s website, providing patrons access to existing sound recordings.

 

“In the 50 years since NEH’s founding, the Endowment has supported excellence in the humanities by funding far-reaching research, preservation projects and public programs,” said NEH Chairman William Adams. “The grants continue that tradition, making valuable humanities collections, exhibitions, documentaries, and educational resources available to communities across the country.”

 

Upon completion, the project will serve as a model for a follow-up project to survey the Ransom Center’s archival moving image materials.

 

 

Related content:

NEH grants Ransom Center $500,000 to establish exhibition endowment

 

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Amplify the Harry Ransom Center!

By Harry Ransom Center

The Harry Ransom Center is excited to announce its participation in this year’s Amplify Austin Day. Beginning on March 5 at 6 p.m., we will be asking for your help in raising $5,000 within a 24-hour period. We are proud to be a part of this year’s community-wide effort to give back to the city of Austin. So mark your calendars and help support your community and the Ransom Center on this day of giving!

 

Proceeds raised will be used to support the Ransom Center’s upcoming exhibitions and programming. The money raised will assist in:

 

  • developing future exhibitions
  • creating and launching web exhibitions
  • supporting teacher training opportunities and family-guide materials
  • publishing exhibition catalogs and companion books
  • collaborating with other museums

 

The Center’s exhibitions are free and open to the public. With your support, we can continue to share our world-renowned collections. Schedule a donation.

 

Photo by Maritza De La Pena.

Gerald W. Cloud named as Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Curator of Early Books and Manuscripts

By Jennifer Tisdale

Gerald Cloud. Photo by Alexis Catnooks.
Gerald Cloud. Photo by Alexis Catnooks.

The Harry Ransom Center announces the appointment of Gerald W. Cloud as its Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Curator of Early Books and Manuscripts.

Cloud will be responsible for overseeing the Ransom Center’s extensive holdings of early books and manuscripts, including promoting access to, and use of, the collections and interpreting them for varied audiences. The Ransom Center’s Pforzheimer Library of English Literature is one of the cornerstones of the Center’s early books and manuscripts collections.

Prior to joining the Ransom Center, Cloud served as head librarian at UCLA’s William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, curator of literature at Columbia University’s Rare Book & Manuscript Library, and most recently as an antiquarian bookseller at James Cummins Bookseller.

“Gerald’s professional experiences—academic teaching, collection development, knowledge of the antiquarian book trade, scholarship in bibliography and the history of the book—will be invaluable to the Ransom Center and its patrons,” said Steve Enniss, Director of the Harry Ransom Center.

Cloud will support researchers working with the Ransom Center’s early book and manuscripts collections and collaborate with colleagues to promote enhanced access to collections, including digital initiatives and exhibitions. He’ll also work closely with the Center’s conservation department on setting treatment priorities for collection materials as well as expanding and strengthening the Pforzheimer Library.

“I look forward to raising the profile of the Ransom Center’s collections and invigorating use for original research with scholars, students, faculty and others,” said Cloud.

Holdings within the Pforzheimer Library include the plays, poems, novels, essays, polemical writings, and translations of some of the most important English writers from 1475 to 1700. All major writers (William Caxton, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, John Donne, Francis Bacon, John Milton, Andrew Marvell, John Dryden, and William Congreve, among many others) are represented by first and important editions. The Pforzheimer books are supplemented by 2,000 manuscript items.

Cloud begins his position on January 12, 2015.

Holiday hours at the Ransom Center

By Marlene Renz

The Ransom Center will be closed on Christmas Eve Day (Wednesday, December 24) and Christmas Day (Thursday, December 25). However, the Ransom Center Galleries will be open the rest of winter break on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and on Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. Additional member-only hours will be available from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday and Sunday.

 

Visitors can view the current exhibitions The Making of Gone With The Wind as well as Frida Kahlo’s Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and HummingbirdThe Making of Gone With The Wind will be open through January 4. The First Photograph and the Gutenberg Bible remain on permanent display.

 

Please also be aware that the Reading and Viewing Rooms and administrative office will be closed during the University holidays from Saturday, December 20, through Thursday, January 1.

 

Free docent-led gallery tours occur daily at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. (There will be no public tour on the closed days of Wednesday, December 24 or Thursday, December 25.) The public tours meet in the south atrium, and no reservations are required. On weekends, a selection of screentests from Gone With The Wind will be shown in the Ransom Center’s first-floor theater at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

 

Admission is free. Your donation will support the Ransom Center’s exhibitions and public programs. Parking information and a map are available online.

 

Receive the Harry Ransom Center’s latest news and information with eNews, a monthly email. Subscribe today.

 

Image: Scene concept for “Christmas at Aunt Pittypat’s in Atlanta” in Gone With The Wind.

Thanksgiving weekend hours at the Ransom Center

By Marlene Renz

Please be aware that the Ransom Center will be closed on Thanksgiving Day.  However, the Ransom Center Galleries will be open on Friday, November 28, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday, November 29, and Sunday, November 30. Additional member-only hours will be available from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday and Sunday.

 

Visitors can view the current exhibition The Making of Gone With The Wind as well as Frida Kahlo’s Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird. The First Photograph and the Gutenberg Bible remain on permanent display.

 

Free docent-led gallery tours will occur daily at noon and at 2 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The public tours meet in the south atrium, and no reservations are required.  A selection of screentests from Gone With The Wind will be shown in the Ransom Center’s first-floor theater on weekends at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

 

Admission is free. Your donation supports the Ransom Center’s exhibitions and public programs. Parking information and a map are available online.

 

The Ransom Center’s Reading and Viewing Rooms and administrative office will be closed on Thursday, November 27, and Friday, November 28, and will reopen on Monday, December 1.

 

Share your love of film, literature, and photography this year by giving a gift membership to the Ransom Center. Purchase online or at the Ransom Center’s visitor desk.

 

Image: Norman Bel Geddes draws a concept for a  Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade float, ca. 1926. Unidentified photographer.