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Poe Mania: Parody Poe for the chance to win

By Alicia Dietrich

“The Vulture,” a parody of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven”
“The Vulture,” a parody of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven”

Written by: Alicia Dietrich

Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” has been one of his most popular poems since its publication in 1845 in the New York Evening Mirror newspaper. This popularity has led to a number of parodies, or humorous imitations, of the poem. The tradition of writing parodies of “The Raven” dates back at least as far as 1853, when Graham’s Magazine published “The Vulture: An Ornithological Study.” Its first stanza begins:

Once upon a midnight chilling, as I held my feet unwilling
O’er a tub of scalding water, at a heat of ninety-four;
Nervously a toe in dipping, dripping, slipping, then out-skipping
Suddenly there came a ripping whipping, at my chamber’s door.
“’Tis the second-floor,” I muttered, “flipping at my chamber’s door—
Wants a light—and nothing more!”

Visit the Poe Project website to compose your own parody of “The Raven,” and you’ll be entered in a drawing to win Poe-centric prizes.

Rehearsing the American Dream: Arthur Miller’s Theater

By Harry Ransom Center

As the first exhibition organized from Arthur Miller’s entire archive, Rehearsing the American Dream: Arthur Miller’s Theater offers new insights on the author of such plays as Death of a Salesman and The Crucible. The exhibition reveals Miller’s active engagement with his era and examines his politics, his plays, and his legacy.

Curator Charlotte Canning, professor in the Department of Theatre and Dance at The University of Texas at Austin, conducted a curator’s tour of the exhibition. Below you can listen to audio excerpts from the tour by clicking on the icon above each section. Read more

Insider’s Perspective: The Hip and the Square

By Harry Ransom Center

In the fall 2006 exhibition Norman Mailer Takes on America, visitors were asked to record their thoughts on three different topics that Norman Mailer had responded to over the course of his writing career. Composition notebooks and pencils were provided for visitor response, and the notebooks have become part of the Ransom Center’s archive. Read more