Navigate / search

Which biblical stories are illustrated in this fore-edge painting?

By Ryan Hildebrand

Click to view page with larger image
Click to view page with larger image

Last year the Ransom Center received as a gift a bible printed in 1481, in Basel by Johan de Amerbach, that was adorned with a 19th century fore-edge painting by bibliophile John T. Beer. The scene is described in a checklist of Beer’s fore-edge paintings simply as “A scene on the Nile,” and the image is sufficiently vague to merit such a title.

What biblical paintings might have inspired the painting? Some have suggested Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego; Joseph and his brothers; and the Holy Family leaving Egypt. Can any of these suggestions be substantiated based on the details present in the painting? Take a close look and leave a comment with your thoughts.

Read this recent article for more information about this bible and its fore-edge painting.

Ransom Center acquires new Graham Greene materials

By Harry Ransom Center

An unusual set of circumstances brought four separate Graham Greene collections, from disparate parts of the world, to the Ransom Center over the past several months. The first of these collections arrived from Helsinki, Finland, the home of Rolando Pieraccini, an Italian writer who published limited editions of several of Greene’s books.  The collection includes 215 letters from Greene to Pieraccini and other correspondents, dating from the 1930s to 1991, the year of Greene’s death. Read more

Ransom Center acquires additional Bernard Malamud materials

By Harry Ransom Center

The Harry Ransom Center recently acquired new materials related to writer Bernard Malamud. These materials, purchased from his daughter, Janna Malamud Smith, complement the existing Malamud archive at the Ransom Center, which comprises more than 37 boxes of correspondence and papers. The Ransom Center acquired the original collection in the late 1990s. Read more

Curator’s Pick: Das Kapital

By Harry Ransom Center

The Ransom Center holds in its collections a first edition of Das Kapital, inscribed by author Karl Marx and published in 1867. The book, purchased by the University in 1969 at an auction, is inscribed to English socialist reformer John Malcolm Ludlow on the title page: “J. M. Ludlow, Esq. / On the part of the author.” In his memoirs, Ludlow later regretted that he hadn’t used the gift as an opportunity to meet the author. Read more

The Alan Furst papers: Interrogation of a spy novelist

By Harry Ransom Center

One of the more thrilling aspects of being a writer is never knowing who might read your stuff. You can safely bet on your mom, a few colleagues, and the occasional library archivist, but beyond that, it’s a toss-up. Alan Furst hit the jackpot when a copy of his book The Polish Officer found its way onto the nightstand of Thomas Staley, director of the Harry Ransom Center, who discovered in Furst’s prose a singular ability to recreate the tense and shadowy atmosphere that gripped pre-World War II Europe. Furst reminded Staley of Graham Greene, whose papers the Ransom Center already housed, and Staley thought Furst’s meticulous research files and neatly typewritten manuscripts would fit nicely next to Greene’s on the shelves of the Ransom Center’s Reading Room. He approached Furst and, after a few years of negotiating, purchased Furst’s collection for an undisclosed amount.

Furst visited Austin in October to kick off the Texas Book Festival with a reading from his latest novel, the New York Times bestseller The Foreign Correspondent. With his collection now open to the public, we crept into the Ransom Center’s Reading Room to sift through a few boxes of his papers, curious to see how one goes about writing spy novels. At the tops of the following pages, you’ll find scans of some of the materials in Furst’s first novel, Night Soldiers, that represent the various stages in the writing process. We then sat down with Furst and asked him how he does it…

By: Tim Taliaferro. This article originally appeared in March/April 2007 issue of The Alcalde.

Read more