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Photo Friday

By Jennifer Tisdale

Each Friday, the Ransom Center shares photos from throughout the week that highlight a range of activities and collection holdings. We hope you enjoy these photos that reveal some of the everyday happenings at the Center.

Actors Adam Couperthwaite and Robbie Ann Darby perform in ‘No Snakes in This Grass,’ a one-act play by James Magnuson, director of the Michener Center for Writers. Prior to Thanksgiving, The University of Texas at Austin Graduate School and the James A. Michener Center for Writers hosted the event outside the Ransom Center. Photo by Pete Smith.
Actors Adam Couperthwaite and Robbie Ann Darby perform in ‘No Snakes in This Grass,’ a one-act play by James Magnuson, director of the Michener Center for Writers. Prior to Thanksgiving, The University of Texas at Austin Graduate School and the James A. Michener Center for Writers hosted the event outside the Ransom Center. Photo by Pete Smith.
Students following the program song list that Thomas G. Palaima created for the Ransom Center’s Poetry on the Plaza 'Harmonica Bob: The Poetry of Bob Dylan.' Palaima is the Dickson Centennial Professor of Classics and Director of the Program in Aegean Scripts and Prehistory at The University of Texas at Austin. Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.
Students following the program song list that Thomas G. Palaima created for the Ransom Center’s Poetry on the Plaza 'Harmonica Bob: The Poetry of Bob Dylan.' Palaima is the Dickson Centennial Professor of Classics and Director of the Program in Aegean Scripts and Prehistory at The University of Texas at Austin. Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.
Judith Freeman, author of 'The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and The Woman He Loved,' researches the archive of jazz journalist and historian Ross Russell. Freeman is a recipient of a fellowship funded by the Erle Stanley Gardner Endowment for Mystery Studies. Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.
Judith Freeman, author of 'The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and The Woman He Loved,' researches the archive of jazz journalist and historian Ross Russell. Freeman is a recipient of a fellowship funded by the Erle Stanley Gardner Endowment for Mystery Studies. Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.

Tonight: “Winston Churchill’s Public Library” lecture and webcast at 7 p.m. (CST)

By Jennifer Tisdale

Winston Churchill by unknown photographer. Undated. ‘New York Journal-American’ collection.
Winston Churchill by unknown photographer. Undated. ‘New York Journal-American’ collection.

Drew University historian Jonathan Rose delivers the inaugural Donald G. Davis, Jr. Lecture, “Winston Churchill’s Public Library,” tonight at 7 p.m. (CST) at the Harry Ransom Center.

View a live webcast of this event starting at approximately 7 p.m. (CST).

In his lecture, Rose explores the relationship between politicians and literature. Are politicians’ agendas molded by literature? How far are their policies and tactics shaped by poetry, prose, and drama? Rose focuses on the career of Winston Churchill by examining the books he read. George Bernard Shaw, H. G. Wells, John Galsworthy, and Siegfried Sassoon; The Red Badge of Courage, The Good Earth, Gone With The Wind, and 1984—these and many other books and authors exerted a powerful influence on Churchill and his brilliant career.

Rose is the William R. Kenan Professor of History at Drew University. He was the founding president for the Society of the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing. His publications include A Companion to the History of the Book (with Simon Eliot), The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes, and The Holocaust and the Book: Destruction and Preservation.

Ransom Center accepting applications for Mellon Summer Institute in Spanish Paleography

By Alicia Dietrich

Petition for summons by the corregidor Andrés Fernández de Herrera, Valle de Cochabamba, Bolivia, 1596. HRC 117, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts collection. Harry Ransom Center.
Petition for summons by the corregidor Andrés Fernández de Herrera, Valle de Cochabamba, Bolivia, 1596. HRC 117, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts collection. Harry Ransom Center.

Applications are being accepted by the Ransom Center for the Mellon Summer Institute in Spanish Paleography, occurring in Austin June 6-24, 2011. The institute is an opportunity for scholars to acquire intensive training in reading late medieval and early modern manuscripts of Spain and Latin America. All application materials must be received by Tuesday, March 1, 2011.

World AIDS Day 2010: How to have literature in a pandemic

By Gabriela Redwine

Cover of Yvonne Vera's 'The Stone Virgins'
Cover of Yvonne Vera's 'The Stone Virgins'
Even though HIV/AIDS has been influencing American cultural production since the 1980s, only in the last ten years or so has the Ransom Center begun to acquire collections with materials documenting the effects of the pandemic.

One recent acquisition that highlights the consequences of the disease on African literature is the Charles R. Larson collection of African and African-American literature. Larson is a professor of literature at American University, as well as a writer and editor. His papers include correspondence and manuscripts by Yvonne Vera (1964–2005), the prolific Zimbabwean novelist and short story writer who died of AIDS in 2005.

In 1987, Vera moved to Toronto, where she lived with her husband and earned her undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral degrees at York University. She tested positive for HIV in 1989, and wrote her first short story, “Independence Day,” in 1991. “I want to be a writer who can give you the illusion that you have two hearts,” Vera said in a 2002 interview with Grace Mutandwa. “My tales are tragic, rather than sad, meaning they have a catastrophic force. Some writers can give you two heartbeats—one for the beauty of the words, another for the event. I want to be a writer who can give you the illusion that you have two hearts.”

During her lifetime, she published five novels, a short story collection, and an edited anthology of African women’s writing. Vera’s novel Under the Tongue (1996) won the 1997 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize (Africa region) for best novel, and her last published novel, The Stone Virgins (2002), won the Macmillan Writer’s Prize for Africa for best unpublished manuscript. She moved back to Zimbabwe in 1995 and served as Director of the National Gallery in Bulawayo from 1997 until 2003.

The Larson collection contains important correspondence between Charles Larson and John Jose, Vera’s husband, regarding her life and work. At the time of her death, Vera was working on a novel called Obedience, which remains unpublished. The novel was written before she returned to Canada in 2004, and the fragmented manuscript and deteriorating quality of her writing reflect the AIDS-related cognitive difficulties she was experiencing at the time. The Larson papers contain drafts of the manuscript, as well as notes by Jose about Vera’s planned revisions.

Vera’s death and the work she left behind are reminders of the literary cost of the AIDS pandemic in Zimbabwe and southern Africa, in particular, as well as worldwide.